Federal investment helps UBC researchers and students push the boundaries of knowledge and innovation

UBC Science researchers received $16 million in support as part of a half-billion-dollar Federal investment.

UBC Science researchers have received more than $16 million in support as part of a half-billion-dollar Federal investment in scientific and engineering research across Canada. The University also received $6 million in support for postgraduate student scholarships and fellowships.

The Minister of National Defence, Harjit Sajjan, on behalf of the Minister of Science, Kirsty Duncan, announced the $515 million in support for fundamental research at the University of British Columbia today. This is NSERC’s largest annual investment, and assists researchers by offering financial support though scholarships, fellowships, research supplements, and equipment grants.

"The Government of Canada is committed to investing in fundamental research and engineering that will improve and enrich our country’s knowledge economy," said Duncan.

"We believe in encouraging scientists’ cutting-edge ideas that will lead Canada to greater social and economic growth. I am particularly proud of the support offered to postgraduate students and postdoctoral fellows, who, thanks to today’s investment, will be exposed to advanced training experiences that will prepare them for the jobs and opportunities of tomorrow."

Seventy-five research projects within the Faculty of Science received support and more than 30 students earned fellowships or scholarships.

"Whether investigating climate change, human health, new materials or innovative wireless systems, NSERC’s investment will enable our researchers to remain at the forefront of an impressive range of scientific and technological fields," said Gail Murphy, UBC vice president, research and innovation.

"Today’s awards are a testament to UBC’s commitment to scientific excellence, and will accelerate discovery and real-world applications."

UBC zoologist Trish Schulte received $450,000 to investigate the mechanisms of environmental acclimation and adaptation in fish.

"Fish play an important role not only in our economy, but also the cultural and social fabric of Canada," said Schulte. "Due to climate change and human-caused changes to their natural habitats, however, it's important for us to understand how fish respond to changes in their environment. This generous NSERC funding allows researchers to ask questions that push forward scientific frontiers, and to develop the scientific knowledge to make evidence-based decisions on how to best manage and preserve fish stocks."

Whether investigating climate change, human health, new materials or innovative wireless systems, NSERC’s investment will enable our researchers to remain at the forefront of an impressive range of scientific and technological fields.